Significant Aspects of Learning, levels 2,3 and 4

Second level listening

 

 Listening for information and listening when talking to others

 

 

1)    Learners can understand the modern language used in a variety of ways, including for example songs and rhymes, classroom instructions, games, video clips and presentations by one of their peers.

 

Songs are incorporated into the Studio books, but other ways are used as appropriate, e.g. Moustache, songs from Notre Dame de Paris (also used in video clips), LaGaf, Youtube etc..

 

Learners may be asked to prepare a text for writing and speaking, and may be assessed by others (with clear reference to success criteria), or pupil may simply read text to class as a demonstration or as part of an exercise.

 

Learners may be given class instructions in French.

 

 

 

2)    Learners can demonstrate understanding in a variety of ways such as mime, following instructions or completing an information grid.

 

 

Learners are regularly asked to complete grids or jot down the main import of a sentence.

They will be expected to understand and follow instructions, and if all else fails, the teacher may resort to mime!

 

 

3)    Learners can understand simple sentences which may include some connectors such as et and mais, some adjectives or adverbs such as vite or bien, to make the language more interesting.

 

Connectors are an essential element of sentences, and are incorporated from halfway through Accès Studio.

 

 

 

4)    Learners can understand when the language gives basic information about other people, for example saying what someone’s age is.

 

 

 

  Descriptions of self and others are covered (and frequently  revisited) from Studio 1, Module 1.

 

 

 

5)    Learners can understand sentences in the present tense and words related to other times such as demain or le weekend. If they hear other tenses being used, they can recognise the meaning of the verb though not the tense.

 

The present tense is taught formally during Module 2 of Studio 1, as well as frequency and other time phrases. Recognition of familiar words and verbs is accentuated.

 

 

6)    Learners understand basic familiar vocabulary related to personal information and themes of interest to them. When there are unknown, extraneous words such as extra adjectives or adverbs, they can still understand the basic meaning of the phrase or sentence.

 

This approach forms the basis of teaching for each module – provide basic vocabulary and structures within a familiar context, then build on that vocabulary and those structures with material which is not familiar.

 

 

 

7)    Learners can work out some unknown words through the support of mime or gesture.

 

Suggestions for unknown words may come from discussion of context and familiar words and cognates. Mime or gesture may be used to help.

 

 

 

8)    Learners can sustain their understanding of fairly short pieces of spoken language or longer pieces contained within rhymes or songs. Through the support of mime, gesture and photographs, they understand the meaning behind short stories, songs or rhymes.

 

Songs, texts and dialogues are used in listening, with understanding developed as we recognise familiar words and try to establish the meaning of less familiar words using strategies as above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

9)    Learners can respond appropriately to questions in a conversation or role-play situation, where the interlocutor uses mainly familiar vocabulary and phrases.

 

Rôle-play and dialogues are an essential element in Studio, and are developed and used regularly between teachers and learners, and learners and other learners.

 

 

 

10) In transactional role-plays such as buying things in shops learners can understand learned material although the interlocutor may introduce a few new words which are not essential to understanding the conversation.

 

 

This is usually how new vocabulary is introduced – by combining it with what is familiar to ease interpretation and understanding.

 

 

 

11) Learners’ knowledge of the culture of the country/countries where the language is spoken helps them understand cultural references such as different foods.

 

Areas such as school, food, home, music, hobbies and film are discussed so learners have some background knowledge.

 

 

12) Learners do not have to recognise tenses other than the present tense but where one is used occasionally, learners can recognise and respond to, the verb.

 

While basic understanding of the verb used is clearly to be encouraged, some effort is put in to referring to the tense used and providing a simple and brief explanation of it – enough to allow a fuller understanding rather than simple recognition of the verb.

 

13) Conversations and role-plays last long enough to allow learners to demonstrate their understanding of basic structures and familiar vocabulary in new, as well as different, contexts.

 

Length is to be defined. New and different contexts use familiar language. Verbs may be used in different contexts, as are time and expressions of preference. Effort is made to allow learners to demonstrate their learning by way of developed and reasonably complex presentations and/or dialogues.

Second level talking

 

1)    Through talking activities including songs, rhymes, games, role-play and short presentations, learners can convey present time by using aspects of the present tense.

 

Learners learn to discuss what they like and dislike, do at school, do for hobbies, what they think of things, what people are like – all using the present tense.

 

2,3,4,5) Learners can add a few simple adjectives, adverbs and connectors to make their use of language more interesting. Learners can talk about themselves as well as other people, using familiar language. Learners can use simple, familiar vocabulary to help them talk about themselves, others and things which interest them such as hobbies or saving animals. Learners can say what they like and don’t like on any topic.

 

Learners will learn how to do all the above in Modules 1,2 and 3 of Studio 1.

 

 

6) Learners’ use of familiar language is consistently accurate and understood by their peers and their teacher.

 

Language is read, heard, written and spoken, with explanations of structures and words to allow learners to express themselves as clearly and as accurately as they can manage.

 

7) Learners can read aloud a simple text at reasonable speed, with confidence. Learners’ pronunciation of familiar vocabulary makes the meaning clear. They can work out new words by using what they know about sound patterns in the modern language.

 

Texts may be read by the teacher and repeated by the learner, or may be read immediately by the learner, depending on the level of confidence. Repetition may be used to enhance clarity. Learners are constantly encouraged to “look within” new words to see if they recognise any words (foreign or mother-tongue) in them.

 

8) Learners can sustain talk consistently through songs, rhymes, games, talks or role-play in a range of contexts, for long enough to demonstrate the skills and knowledge of structure outlined above.

 

Exercises are done to provide opportunity for learners to express their thoughts and exercise the language they have been studying in the course of the Module.

 

Organising and using information. Presentations and talks: specific skills

 

 

9) Learners can deliver a short presentation about themselves or a theme which interests them. They may use support from ICT or story boards for example.

 

Learners are frequently invited to write and then present pieces on hobbies and feelings on various topics.

 

10) Learners can work together to prepare a presentation with a good percentage of the modern language, on a theme of their choice.

 

In S3 (level 3?), learners have been asked to work together to produce a presentation (sometimes using Windows Movie Maker or on PowerPoint) on a film they have studied. Similar skills may be applied to other topics.

Talking and listening with others. Conversations: specific skills

 

11) Learners can engage in short conversations, games or role-play activities, using simple sentences, supported by gestures where appropriate. They can use some polite social terms to begin and end the interaction.

 

Such items are a regular part of the learning process. Polite social terms can easily be applied.

 

12) In conversations, games and role-plays, learners use familiar vocabulary, phrases and sentences. They can use these in different contexts to generate different sentences.

 

Familiar language, phrases and applications of such will be pointed out, allowing learners to cope with new situations using familiar language.

 

13) Learners can ask for help using learned phrases such as Je ne comprends pas.

 

A list of such phrases is easily produced and applied.

 

 

14) Learners can ask simple questions to sustain a conversation. This may simply involve phrases such as Et toi? They can keep a game going with phrases such as A toi.

 

Learners are taught “Et toi?” very early on (though they often forget such phrases!).

 

15) Learners can only use the informal form of address except for some basic learned phrases such as Et vous?

 

The informal form is the usual form of address, though attention is drawn to the “vous” form (and explained) when er verb endings are introduced.

 

16) They can cope with extra questions if these use known vocabulary and structures.

 

This depends on the complexity of the question, but they are encouraged to work things out from context, familiar language and tone.

 

17) Learners are learning about the culture of the country/countries where the language is spoken through cultural references such as café menus or cartoon characters in role-play situations.

 

Background information is provided through discussion of personal experiences, film, Youtube, texts, songs and textbooks.

 

18) Learners can talk for long enough to demonstrate the level of language outlined above. They can engage in conversations, games and role-plays which vary in length according to the context but remain fairly short.

 

Learners will prepare and engage in a variety of exercises which put in to practice the language studied.

 

Second level reading

Reading to find out information, reading for enjoyment

 

 

1)    Learners can understand content which refers to cultural aspects of the country where the language is spoken. While knowledge of the culture is not assessed formally, it features in stories, songs and rhymes, as well as texts about life in the countries where the language is spoken.

 

Texts in Studio 1 deal with school, hobbies, food, towns etc.. The book also contains songs and rhymes. We also look at various films, songs and Youtube clips.

 

2)    Learners can understand a range of texts in a variety of media, including stories, non-fiction texts and emails.

 

Apart from different styles of text in the textbook, DVDs, Youtube and songs, we have also recently acquired a set of Bibliobus short stories which we will try to use in the course of the year.

 

3)    Learners can understand texts which range from words and phrases to short texts. With appropriate support, they can understand the gist of short stories.

 

Texts used vary considerably in length and level of difficulty.

 

4)    Learners can understand texts which use familiar, basic vocabulary. They can still understand when this vocabulary is used in contexts which move from personal information to information about other people, including those in other countries. In doing so, they demonstrate they can apply the language they have learned in different contexts. For example, vocabulary for pets and food may be extended to include rare animals and basic foods those animals eat.

 

As indicated above, learners are encouraged to recognise and apply knowledge of familiar words and phrases in unfamiliar settings.

 

5)    Learners can work out the meaning of short texts on their own, as well as with others. When they work with others, they can understand longer texts.

 

Learners are generally encouraged to work together to come to an understanding of texts, though occasionally they are asked to work alone and then discuss with others and help them if necessary.

6)    Learners can understand stories, songs, poems and rhymes which contain a basic range of familiar vocabulary and structures, often used in unfamiliar contexts. They can understand more extended vocabulary, with support.

 

As indicated above, learners are encouraged to recognise and apply knowledge of familiar words and phrases in unfamiliar settings.

 

7)    Learners can understand texts made up of phrases and simple sentences, mostly in the present tense. Learners can recognise the verb if another tense is used.

 

Texts will usually be in the present tense and learners should be able to recognise familiar verbs. Some attempt will be made to allow learners to gain at least some understanding of whatever other tense is used.

 

8)    Learners can understand sentences which include some basic adjectives, conjunctions and adverbs such as vite or bien. They are aware of grammatical points like endings on adjectives and these help them understand the meaning.

 

Such grammar points are included from early on in Studio 1, and are explained and applied.

 

9)    Learners are developing reading strategies such as skimming, working out the meaning of words from the context, with support from mime or gesture or by recognising similarities to English words. They can demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways such as explaining a story to others, matching words and phrases to pictures or rearranging sentences to tell a story correctly.

 

Learners are encouraged to work out meanings from context and familiarity. Learners may discuss meaning of texts with one another or the teacher, or match words, rearrange sentences, or match words to pictures.

 

10) Learners understand when to use a bilingual dictionary to look up simple words and may do so with some support from their peers.

 

Some work has been done with learners and dictionaries, but there is some resistance – they prefer to ask the teacher or refer to Google translate! However, we shall persevere!

 

11) Learners require some support from a bilingual dictionary or key word lists prepared by the teacher.

 

See above.

Second level writing

Writing to engage a reader, to give information about oneself and others, including experiences, to discuss a topic, to give opinions and reasons

 

1,2,3,4,10) Learners can write for different purposes such as labelling, leaving brief messages, writing short sentences to illustrate a story or writing a short text about themselves and others, including giving their opinion about something. Learners can write at least a few sentences, appropriate to the task. Learners can link a few sentences on their chosen theme. When learners write on a theme, such as themselves, their sentences follow on from each other to make a coherent whole.

Learners can write some personal information about others.

 

 

Learners are encouraged to produce descriptions of themselves and others, with input and help from the teacher and book. These descriptions, while broken down to component parts, can run together to form a coherent whole (prepared for assessments).

 

5) Learners can use vocabulary familiar to them but may use it in different ways. For example, they may say which foods they like as well as which sports they like.

 

As indicated above, learners are encouraged to recognise and apply knowledge of familiar words and phrases in unfamiliar settings.

 

6) Learners can produce writing which is simple and mostly accurate in terms of verbs and adjectives. There may make a few mistakes with endings. The meaning is clear. They are aware of accents and how they affect the sound.

 

Work is prepared as a class, in pairs and individually. Effort is made to be as accurate as possible, but credit is given for clarity if not necessarily accuracy.

 

7,8,9) Learners can use simple sentences and basic structures. They may make some use of conjunctions. Learners can make some use of basic adjectives or adverbs to make the writing more interesting. Learners can use the present tense correctly, in learned phrases and sentences. They may use a range of verbs.

 

This is the aim of the Modules and their assessments, and this is clearly set out in learning intentions and revision notes.

 

11,12) Learners require support from a bilingual dictionary and word banks. They use these to check their spelling. Learners can use reference materials and other short texts to help them plan their writing and check the accuracy of their own and others’ work.

Learners are encouraged to use dictionaries, texts, the teacher and one another to help produce texts.

Significant Aspects of Learning third level

Third level listening

 

 Listening for information and listening when talking to others

 

 

 

1)    Learners can understand the modern language used in a variety of ways, including for example video clips, songs, television adverts, presentations by one or more speakers and conversations.

 

Songs and dialogues are incorporated into the Studio books, but other ways are used as appropriate, e.g. Moustache (Eurovision song), songs from Notre Dame de Paris (also used in video clips), LaGaf, Youtube (funny French adverts) etc..

 

 

2)    Learners can demonstrate understanding in a variety of ways such as following instructions or using the information to contribute to a presentation.

 

 

Learners are expected to follow instructions when given in French and may respond appropriately on hearing information.

 

 

3)    Learners can understand complex sentences with connectors, conjunctions, adjectives or adverbs which add depth to language.

 

Learners regularly hear extended sentences (testing elements covered in lessons) in the course of Studio Module listening work, and may occasionally be asked to listen to a short story recounted in French. Written work done in class will also be read aloud.

 

 

4)    Learners can understand when the language refers to other people and is not limited to the first person.

 

 

Although many of the listening exercises are in the first person, several are in the third person, and there are several written exercises emphasising the third person and the answers will be read out and heard by the class.

 

 

 

5)    Learners can understand a range of tenses and structures and recognise the difference these makes to meaning. Some structures may be unfamiliar.

 

As tenses and structures are introduced (e.g. verb + infinitive, Studio 1, Module 3, or perfect tense, Studio 2, Modules 2 & 3), listening exercises incorporate these tenses and structures. Written work is also done in class and sentences/extended pieces of writing are produced and read to the class.

 

6)    Learners can understand a growing range of vocabulary on relevant themes which goes beyond basic personal language. Some words and phrases will be unfamiliar.

 

This is an essential element of the teaching and development of knowledge of the foreign language. Topics and themes will be relevant to learners’ own lives, allowing personal input, but language used is constantly developing in complexity as well as breadth.

 

7, 8) Learners can work out the meaning of unfamiliar language by using strategies such as contextual clues to work out the meaning. Learners can understand speech of increasing length, showing an ability to get the gist and pick out key information.

 

 

As progress is made, language heard and produced will grow in length and complexity. Learners are encouraged to break down sentences into smaller understandable chunks, and to use their previous knowledge as well as the context to take sensible guesses at the meaning of words and phrases.

 

9, 10) Learners can move from predictable, prepared dialogue to interactions with a level of unpredictability. They can respond appropriately, based on an understanding of the conversation. In transactional role-plays such as buying things in shops, learners understand language which goes beyond rote learned material.

 

Learners find dealing with unknown vocabulary in listening and talking very difficult. They are taught to focus on language they recognise and are familiar with, and to apply knowledge of language to unfamiliar contexts, but they find it difficult to do so.

 

11) Learners’ knowledge of the culture of the country/countries where the language is spoken helps them understand cultural references such as different foods.

 

Language is taught within a cultural context and background cultural knowledge is developed along with language itself, allowing learners to have a fuller understanding of texts.

 

12) Learners can understand a range of tenses as appropriate, and can respond appropriately.

 

Tenses are introduced at various points in the course of the year and learners are taught how to apply these tenses to a variety of contexts.

 

13) Conversations and role-plays last long enough to allow learners to demonstrate depth of learning and knowledge about language as well as the application of learning in new contexts.

 

Length is to be defined. Effort is made to allow learners to demonstrate their learning by way of developed and reasonably complex presentations and/or dialogues.

 

 

Third level talking

 

1)    Through talks, presentations, role-plays or dialogues, learners can convey the notion of past, present and future time. This would include use of the present tense and aspects of other tenses. These may be restricted to je suis allé, je voudrais or c’était

 

The present, perfect, conditional (je voudrais) and immediate future tenses are all introduced in Studio 2. Effort is made to allow learners to express themselves reasonably fully, but some may limit themselves to set phrases.

 

2)    Learners can use increasingly complex language where they use connectors, adjectives and adverbs consistently to add depth to language.

 

As indicated above, the language used is constantly developing in complexity as well as breadth. Learners are encouraged to use reasonably complex language, and are regularly shown how to apply existing knowledge to new situations and contexts, allowing them to take confidence in their own skills and abilities.

 

3,4,5) Learners can talk about other people and themes as well as themselves to demonstrate the ability to manipulate language. Learners can use an increasing range of vocabulary which goes beyond basic personal information and moves to giving opinions on a wider range of themes. Learners can give their opinion on any topic, going beyond basic vocabulary such as ‘J’aime’ and ‘je déteste’.

 

Learners are encouraged to express their own thoughts and ideas on subjects, but can talk about and describe their home town, school and various films studied in the course of the year in some detail.

 

6) Learners’ use of familiar and some unfamiliar language is increasingly accurate and readily understood.

 

As learners apply familiar language in different contexts, it becomes increasingly accurate and readily understood as they get used to it. Unfamiliar language is dealt with and becomes more familiar with further use.

 

7)    Pronunciation of familiar and some unfamiliar language makes the meaning clear and learners will be able to read out loud at a reasonable speed, with increasing confidence.

 

Learners are regularly asked to read aloud – both texts in the book and pieces they have prepared for themselves. Increasing familiarity with words and their cognates allows learners to gain confidence.

 

8)    Learners can talk at increasing length. They talk for long enough to show the depth of learning outlined above, in a range of contexts.

 

Effort is made to allow learners to demonstrate their learning – exercises are designed to allow learners to express themselves and show reasonable depth and breadth of knowledge. For example, when discussing a film they will give a synopsis, talk about characters and identify themes, then give a personal reaction.

Organising and using information. Presentations and talks: specific skills

 

9)    Learners can deliver a presentation about a theme which interests them entirely in the modern language. They may still use appropriate support such as ICT, or written headings but do not require to read from a script.

 

As part of their course work, learners may be asked to create presentations on a variety of topics – films, school or a famous person. They may use PowerPoint or Windows Movie Maker. They are asked not to refer to a script while presenting their work.

Talking and listening with others. Conversations: specific skills

 

10) Learners’ interactions in role-plays or conversation, are increasingly well structured, relaying information clearly, with openers and concluding remarks

 

Role-plays and conversations are well prepared in advance, with learners given scope to express their own ideas and takes on topics and situations. Opening and concluding remarks will be included.

 

11,12) In conversations and role-plays, learners move from predictable, prepared exchanges to those with a level of unpredictability. They may use learned phrases but can demonstrate the ability to apply the language in different, and sometimes unexpected, contexts. Learners can ask questions and ask for help where appropriate, over a range of tasks.

 

Learners find it difficult to deal with unprepared material and get very nervous about entering a conversation which is not fully thought through. They are reminded that they should identify key words and phrases which are familiar to them, and simply apply what they know when faced with unexpected questions or responses. Suitable questions and responses can easily be prepared in advance. Learners feel this aspect of language learning sets the subject apart from other school subjects where they are expected merely to reproduce knowledge, not to perform and manipulate. This aspect also reveals a lack of knowledge and understanding of (and confidence in) the manipulation of English.

 

13) Learners can lead a conversation, albeit at a basic level.

 

Learners are happy to lead a conversation which has been prepared or thought through.

 

14) Learners can adapt the language to suit the occasion and the interlocutor, demonstrating an understanding of polite forms.

 

Learners are informed of the different forms of address and when to use them.

 

15) Learners can cope when things do not go according to plan.

 

Suitable phrases and responses can be prepared. Learners will usually carry on with questions or phrases which are familiar to them.

 

16) Learners are increasingly knowledgeable about the culture of the country/countries where the language is spoken through cultural references, such as café menus or opening times for tourist attractions in role-play situations.

 

Language is learned through contexts dealing with aspects of life in the country of the language studied.

 

17) Learners can talk for long enough to demonstrate the level of language outlined above. They can engage in conversations and role-plays which vary in length according to the context.

 

Length is to be defined. Effort is made to allow learners to demonstrate their learning by way of developed and reasonably complex presentations and/or dialogues.

 

 

Third level reading

Reading to find out information, reading for enjoyment

 

 

1)    Learners can understand content which refers to cultural aspects of the country where the language is spoken. While knowledge of the culture is not assessed formally, increasingly it is part of learners’ research into topics of interest and features in reading texts.

 

This is a fundamental aspect of the reading done throughout Studio and other areas, such as the study of various films.

 

2)    Learners can understand a wider range of texts in a variety of media such as fiction, non-fiction, poetry, newspaper or magazine articles, emails and faxes.

 

Finding usable texts beyond the textbook has proved very difficult. We have recently acquired a set of Bibliobus books which we intend to use with classes. Studio presents texts in a variety of formats, including email and text messages. Lyrics of songs are studied, as well as the occasional poem, depending on the level of interest of the class. Films and texts on the film have also been studied.

 

3)    Learners can understand texts which vary in length from short messages to short stories, for example.

 

Texts in Studio vary considerably in length. Lyrics, poems and film reviews all vary in length.

 

4)    Learners can understand texts which move from familiar vocabulary on a known theme to more up-to-date and challenging aspects of the same theme. For example, the theme may move from food to the effects of diet on health. In doing so, learners demonstrate they can use and extend learned vocabulary and apply their learning in different contexts.

 

More challenging texts, for example on diet and health, appear in Studio 3. Studios 1 and 2 tend to be more straightforward, though conversation in class may lead to a more complex view. Films studied will be more demanding and require a more complex understanding and response – learners are invited to describe characters, identify themes and provide a personal response.

 

5)    Learners can work out the meaning of texts independently as well as when working with others. When they work with others, they can understand much longer texts.

 

Learners are generally encouraged to work together to come to an understanding of texts, though occasionally they are asked to work alone and then discuss with others and help them if necessary.

 

6)    Learners can understand texts which contain an increasing range of vocabulary and structures, some of which will be unfamiliar.

 

Extension of vocabulary and development of knowledge of structures is a fundamental element of the teaching and learning process in the textbook and in other areas of study.

 

7)    Learners can understand the different meanings behind a range of tenses.

 

Various tenses are covered in Studios 1 and 2 – present, perfect, a touch of imperfect (c’était), immediate future, a touch of conditional (je voudrais).

 

8)    Learners can understand more complex sentences with adjectives, conjunctions, adverbs and connectors for example.

 

Work is done to incorporate such additions in writing and they appear regularly in texts studied.

 

9)    Learners can demonstrate the ability to use reading strategies such as skimming, scanning, recognition of cognates and contextual clues to work out meaning. They can demonstrate their understanding in different ways such as summarising or giving the gist of a text.

 

Learners are encouraged to use knowledge of what is familiar and apply it to what is unfamiliar. Rather than always ask for a complete translation, learners may be asked to say what the text is about.

 

10,11) Learners can use a bilingual dictionary with confidence. Learners require less support from a dictionary, word banks and the teacher for example.

 

Learners are shown how to use a dictionary, but will frequently seek support from one another or the teacher rather than use a dictionary.

Third level writing

Writing to engage a reader, to give information about oneself and others, including experiences, to discuss a topic, to give opinions and reasons

 

 

1)    Learners can write for a variety of purposes such as leaving messages, giving instructions, giving opinions or writing a story.

 

Learners will be asked to produce writing appropriate to the aspect of language being studied at the time – brief descriptions of self, others, school subjects, hobbies or home town. They might also have to give commands, produce an account of what they did last week or what they will do next week. They may also write a review of a film.

 

2)    Learners can write at increasing length, appropriate to the task and audience. They can produce writing which is long enough to show depth of language.

 

Writing exercises may vary considerably from writing a single sentence to producing a complete review of a film.

 

3, 4) Learners can write in sentences and linked paragraphs in longer pieces of writing.

Learners can compose a structured piece of writing with openers and a simple conclusion.

 

e.g. reviews, descriptions of school, home town, hobbies etc..

 

5, 6) Learners use an increasing range of interesting vocabulary which goes beyond basic personal language. They can use it in different ways. Learners can produce writing which is increasingly complex and accurate in terms of verbs, adjectives and sentence structure. The meaning is clear.

 

Writing is discussed and prepared as a class, with direction and guidance as to content, along with input from learners, and then honed and completed by individuals who put their own stamp on their work.

 

7,8,9,10) Learners can use complex sentences with connectors to express opinions and give reasons, for example. Learners can use adjectives and adverbs, as well as a variety of structures, to show depth of language. Learners can demonstrate the notion of past, present and future time. This includes use of the present tense and aspects of other tenses. Learners can go beyond the first person in their writing and include writing about others or themes of interest.

 

As indicated above, learners are invited to write on a variety of topics, using such complex vocabulary and structures as they can cope with and which are relevant to the task. Direction and guidance are offered and learners add their own input.

 

11, 12) Learners require less support to produce writing of an appropriate standard. They can produce pieces of writing using only a dictionary and facts which they have researched. Learners can use reference materials and other texts to plan their writing and check the accuracy of their own and others’ work. Drafts and redrafts provide further evidence of learning.

 

Learners generally require some support beyond just a dictionary in terms of structuring and thinking through a piece of writing, if only for the sake of giving them confidence in their ability to complete the task – they are frequently perfectly able to complete the task in hand, but appreciate some degree of guidance. They are encouraged to help one another and check one another’s work. Drafts will be checked and returned with notes or gone over individually.

 

 

Significant Aspects of Learning fourth level

Fourth level listening

1)    Learners can understand more complex and less

predictable language in a variety of contexts,

including for example video clips, songs,

television adverts, presentations by one or more

speakers and conversations.

Monologues and dialogues are used in Studio 3 and in past papers or specimen papers (N5 and Int 2), films, songs, YouTube, preparation for speaking assessments.

 

2)    Learners can apply understanding of a range of

sources to contribute to a presentation /

discussion in the target language.

Learners can access internet and prepared texts on a variety of themes or films.

 

3)    Learners can understand more complex and less

predictable sentences including those spoken by

sympathetic fluent / native speakers of the

language.

Passages containing reasonably complex and unfamiliar language are incorporated into Studio 3 listening exercises. Past papers and specimen papers are also used. The teacher will also speak to the class or individuals on a topic. “Live” native speakers are not readily available.

 

4)    Learners can understand increasingly complex

and diverse information about other people, for

example cultural, religious and political.

Modules in Studio 3 contain extended language on topics such as health, future plans and character. We also study films such as “Les Misérables” and “Les Choristes”.

 

5)    Learners can increasingly understand present,

perfect, imperfect, conditional and future tenses.

Structures will be increasingly unfamiliar.

These tenses are dealt with and learners will be expected to recognise the familiar among the unfamiliar.

 

6)    Learners can understand a growing range of

vocabulary on relevant themes including up-to-date,

relevant contexts in areas of the world

where the target language is spoken. Words and

phrases will be increasingly unfamiliar.

The content of Studio 3 is relatively up-to-date, but this can be reinforced with texts/songs/films. Knowledge of language will be extended.

7, 8) Learners can work out the meaning of unfamiliar language by using strategies such as contextual clues to work out the meaning. Learners can understand speech of increasing length and complexity, showing an ability to get the gist and pick out key information.

 

 

These are skills encouraged and developed at all levels.

9)         Learners can demonstrate their understanding of the language by responding appropriately to more complex interactions including those involving sympathetic fluent / native speakers of the language.

 

Situations and appropriate reactions can be discussed and prepared in class.

 

 

10)       In transactional role-plays learners understand increasingly complex language, including more spontaneous interactions, the opinions of others and their reasons for them.

 

Learners can plan interactions and try to foresee the direction of a conversation,

but are reminded of familiar and possible responses in unfamiliar contexts.

They are usually advised to have reasons for opinions rather than simply offer an opinion.

 

 

11)       Learners’ knowledge of the culture of the country/countries where the language is spoken helps them understand cultural, political and religious references.

 

Language is taught within a cultural context and background cultural knowledge is developed along with language itself, allowing learners to have a fuller understanding of texts.

 

12)       Learners can understand a range of tenses as appropriate, and can respond appropriately with increasing confidence.

 

Tenses are introduced at various points in the course of the year and learners are taught how to apply these tenses to a variety of contexts. Practice conversations will be held in class.

13)       Conversations and role-plays last long enough to allow learners to demonstrate depth of learning and knowledge about language as well as the application of learning in new contexts.

 

Length is to be defined. Effort is made to allow learners to demonstrate their learning by way of developed and reasonably complex presentations and/or dialogues.

Fourth level talking

 

1)    Through talks, presentations, role-plays or dialogues, learners can convey the notion of time as they become more confident in the use of past, present and future tenses and demonstrate awareness of other tenses.

 

The present, perfect, future and conditional tenses are all introduced in Studio 2 and 3. Effort is made to allow learners to express themselves reasonably fully, but some may limit themselves to set phrases.

 

2)    Learners can use increasingly complex language where they use connectors, adjectives and adverbs appropriately to demonstrate depth of knowledge and application of language.

 

As previously indicated, the language used is constantly developing in complexity as well as breadth. Learners are encouraged to use reasonably complex language, and are regularly shown how to apply existing knowledge to new situations and contexts, allowing them to take confidence in their own skills and abilities.

 

3, 4)     Learners can talk about other people and themes as well as themselves more spontaneously and with growing confidence to demonstrate the ability to manipulate more complex language. Learners can use an increasing range of vocabulary to convey information about a wider range of contexts and can give opinions and reasons for them.

 

Learners are encouraged to express their own thoughts and ideas on subjects, but can talk about and describe their health, future and various films studied in the course of the year in some detail. They will show confidence in prepared material, but find spontaneous discussion difficult. They are reminded of, and are encouraged to apply their knowledge of structures and phrases to that which is unfamiliar to them.

 

5)         Learners can give their opinions, and give reasons for them, on a wider range of topics including up-to-date, relevant contexts, using increasingly complex and unfamiliar vocabulary.

 

Learners will prepare personal responses to material studied in class. The language they use will reflect the complexity of material studied, including what was unfamiliar but which will have been explained.

 

6, 7)     Learners can increasingly apply their knowledge of language / intonation / pronunciation to ensure others understand. Learners can read and pronounce familiar and increasingly unfamiliar words with accuracy, appropriate pace and confidence.

 

Learners are regularly asked to read aloud – both texts in the book and pieces they have prepared for themselves. Increasing familiarity with words and their cognates allows learners to gain confidence.

 

8)    Learners can talk at increasing length. They talk for long enough to show the depth of learning outlined above, in a range of contexts.

 

Effort is made to allow learners to demonstrate their learning – exercises are designed to allow learners to express themselves and show reasonable depth and breadth of knowledge. For example, when discussing a film they will give a synopsis, talk about characters and identify themes, then give a personal reaction.

 

9)    Learners can deliver a more detailed presentation in the modern language using a range of more complex structures with a good level of accuracy. This might include ICT to support talking which could be either individual or group based.

 

As part of their course work, learners may be asked to create presentations on a variety of topics – films, school, a famous person or a topic of their own choosing. They may use PowerPoint or Windows Movie Maker. They are asked not to refer to a script while presenting their work, but can prepare their work as a group or individually.

 

10) Learners’ interactions in role-plays or conversation, are increasingly well structured,

using familiar and unfamiliar language, including language from previous contexts, to relay information clearly, with openers and concluding remarks.

 

Role-plays and conversations are well prepared in advance, with learners given scope to express their own ideas and takes on topics and situations. Opening and concluding remarks will be included.

 

11) In conversations and role-plays, learners move from predictable, prepared exchanges to those with a level of unpredictability. They may use learned phrases but can demonstrate the ability to apply the language in an increasingly wide range of contexts, many of which are unfamiliar.

 

Learners find it difficult to deal with unprepared material and get very nervous about entering into a conversation which is not fully thought through. They are reminded that they should identify key words and phrases which are familiar to them, and simply apply what they know when faced with unexpected questions or responses. Learners feel this aspect of language learning sets the subject apart from other school subjects where they are expected merely to reproduce knowledge, not to perform and manipulate. This aspect also reveals a lack of knowledge and understanding of (and confidence in) the manipulation of English.

 

12) Learners can consult a variety of sources and can work more independently to ensure increasing accuracy in their oral work.

 

Work will be prepared as a class, followed by work as individuals or in groups to complete the task. Learners may consult dictionaries, texts, internet, prepared material, one another and the teacher to help complete the task.

 

 

13) Learners can lead a conversation more confidently. They can incorporate more complex structures with a good degree of accuracy.

 

Learners are happy to lead a conversation which has been prepared or thought through, and will do so with considerable accuracy.

 

14) Learners can adapt the language to suit the occasion and the interlocutor, demonstrating a good understanding of polite forms.

 

Learners are informed of the different forms of address and when to use them.

 

15) Learners can apply strategies in unexpected situations.

 

 

Suitable phrases and responses can be prepared. Learners will usually carry on with questions or phrases which are familiar to them.

 

16) Learners are increasingly knowledgeable about the culture of the country/countries where the language is spoken through cultural references, political and religious themes and current affairs.

 

Language is learned through contexts dealing with aspects of life in the country of the language studied. This is reinforced and developed through the study of various films and songs, and discussion of these as well as some anecdotes from the teacher.

 

17) Learners can engage in conversations and role-plays which vary in length according to the context, using a range of more complex structures with a good level of accuracy.

 

Length is to be defined. Effort is made to allow learners to demonstrate their learning by way of developed and reasonably complex presentations and/or dialogues.

 

Fourth level reading

 

1)    Learners can understand content which refers to current affairs and cultural, political and religious aspects of the country where the language is spoken. While knowledge of the culture is not assessed formally, increasingly it is part of learners’ research into topics of interest and features in a range of reading texts of varying length.

 

This is a fundamental aspect of the reading done throughout Studio and other areas, such as the study of various films. Topics studied include the place of languages in the curriculum (and the world), lifestyles, health, adolescence and rights, social life and future plans. Other topics may include school life and discipline (“Les Choristes”), religion (“Notre Dame de Paris”), and thinking of others (“Les Misérables”).

2)    Learners can understand, appreciate and enjoy a wider range of texts in a variety of media such as fiction, non-fiction, poetry, newspaper or magazine articles, emails and faxes. Learners can respond to texts, recording facts and points of view as appropriate.

 

Studio 3 presents texts in a variety of formats, including email and text messages. Lyrics of songs are studied, as well as the occasional poem, depending on the level of interest of the class. Films and texts on the film have also been studied and learners are invited to produce a review including personal reaction.

3)    Learners can understand and respond to texts which vary in length from short messages to short stories and extracts from novels, for example.

 

Texts in Studio 3 vary considerably in length. Lyrics, poems and film reviews all vary in length. A few novels are available and extracts can easily be reproduced.

4, 5, 6) Learners can select and understand texts on a known / chosen theme which are increasingly challenging. In doing so, learners demonstrate they can use and extend learned vocabulary and apply their learning in very different contexts. Learners can work out the meaning of more challenging and authentic texts some if which may originate from areas where the language is spoken. Learners can understand texts which contain an increasing range of vocabulary and structures, a number of which will be unfamiliar.

 

Learners are encouraged to seek out texts on the internet which will provide substance for presentations. Help is frequently required in finding a text of suitable standard and length – few are readily usable without some adjustment or provision of help.

 

 

7)    Learners can understand the different meanings behind a range of tenses. They identify the concept of time through the language.

 

A good range of tenses is covered throughout S1 to S4, including present, perfect, imperfect, immediate future, future and conditional. These are reinforced at various points, though learners often have trouble remembering the differences as they are not taught tenses formally in English.

 

 

 

8)    Learners can understand, adapt and apply more complex sentences and structures with adjectives, conjunctions, adverbs, irregular verbs and connectors, for example.

 

Work is done to incorporate such additions in writing and they appear regularly in texts studied.

 

9)    Learners can demonstrate the ability to use reading strategies such as skimming, scanning, recognition of cognates and contextual clues to work out the meaning of increasingly complex texts. They can demonstrate their understanding in different ways such as summarising or giving the gist of a text.

 

Learners are encouraged to use knowledge of what is familiar and apply it to what is unfamiliar. Rather than always ask for a complete translation, learners may be asked to say what the text is about. Especially in preparation for exams, learners are advised to “speed read” the text before identifying the precise area to be focused upon.

 

10, 11) Learners can use a bilingual dictionary with confidence and can understand how to use it to manipulate language appropriately. Learners are more strategic in how and when they access support resources.

 

Learners know how to use a dictionary, but will frequently seek support from one another or the teacher rather than use a dictionary. They are also advised on the dangers of misuse and overuse of a dictionary.

 

 

Fourth level writing

1)    Learners can apply their knowledge about language by writing for a range of purposes in a variety of increasingly challenging contexts.

 

Learners will be asked to produce writing appropriate to the aspect of language being studied at the time – brief character descriptions of self, others, health issues, future plans or holiday preferences and experiences. Learners may respond to questions in an exercise, write a descriptive passage, try to produce a poem, respond to a song or a film or write an article for a magazine. They may also simply take notes or play games.

 

2)    Learners can write in sentences and linked paragraphs in longer pieces of writing

demonstrating increasing technical accuracy. They can use openers and conclusions as appropriate.

 

e.g. reviews, descriptions of people, lifestyles and health, future plans etc..

3, 4)     Learners use an increasing range of interesting vocabulary which goes beyond basic personal language. They can use it for an increasing range of purposes, including writing fiction and nonfiction. Learners can manipulate language in writing which is increasingly complex and accurate in terms of verbs, adjectives, sentence structure and use of tense.

 

Writing is discussed and prepared as a class, with direction and guidance as to content and accuracy, along with input from learners, and then honed and completed by individuals who put their own stamp on their work. Learners are rarely asked to produce non-fiction as in the past, learners have got carried away and have produced poor or overly complex and confused efforts.

5)    Learners can write extensively about themselves (including opinions and reasons for them), others and a range of themes of interest.

 

As indicated above, learners are invited to write on a variety of topics, using such complex vocabulary and structures as they can cope with and which are relevant to the task. Direction and guidance are offered and learners add their own input, with a reminder they should give reasons for opinions.

6, 7)     Learners require less support to produce writing of an appropriate standard. They can produce pieces of writing using only a dictionary and facts which they have researched.

Learners can use reference materials and other texts to plan their writing and check the accuracy of their own and others’ work. Drafts and redrafts provide further evidence of learners taking the next steps in learning.

 

Learners generally appreciate some support beyond just a dictionary in terms of structuring and thinking through a piece of writing, if only for the sake of giving them confidence in their ability to complete the task – they are frequently perfectly able to complete the task in hand, but appreciate some degree of guidance. They are encouraged to help one another and check one another’s work. Drafts will be checked and returned with notes or gone over individually.